A Hidden Cause of IBS

Intestines

Essential Information for Anyone Suffering from Chronic Irritable Bowel Syndrome.

Do you have clients, or know of someone with chronic IBS that just won’t respond to any kind of treatment? Maybe they are very constipated and find temporary relief from colon hydrotherapy. Maybe they have tried colon cleanses only to feel worse and sicker than ever. They’ve tried every treatment they know of to feel better but nothing works.
If you know anyone who fits the above description, this post is a must-read – this information might just change their life forever.

The name of the condition that might be causing untold misery to many who suffer from IBS is SIBO: Small Intestinal Bacterial Overgrowth. On a very basic level, this is a condition that happens when the commensal bacteria, that is the bacteria that normally live in the intestine, overgrow in the small intestine. If someone has more than 103 cfu (colony forming units) per mL anywhere in the small intestine, they fit the diagnostic criteria for SIBO.

The symptoms of SIBO include intestinal bloating and gas, constipation or diarrhea or alternating constipation and diarrhea. Associated conditions include chronic fatigue syndrome, fibromyalgia, increased intestinal permeability (leaky gut), acne rosacea, celiac disease, depression and anxiety, and many more.

Diagnosis can be tricky because it’s very difficult to get a sample from the small intestine for direct diagnosis. Normally, diagnosis is done indirectly using a breath test whereby the patient consumes a sugar – lactulose is preferable according to Dr. Siebecker at the NCNM in Portland, Oregon – then exhaled levels of hydrogen and methane are measured over the course of several hours. While this indirect method of diagnosis risks yielding false positives, it is much less likely to miss true positives than the direct sample method and it is far less invasive and less expensive to perform.

Our training program includes a session on SIBO –you’ll find a complete course outline here.

If you would like more information on SIBO – where to send clients and friends to for testing etc, www.siboinfo.com is a great resource.